News

The Views at St. Joseph's Joins Providence Family - January 2019

The Views at St. Joseph’s – a 117-bed seniors’ care home in Comox, BC – has reached an agreement to become a part of the Providence family.

Specifically, The Views has reached an agreement with Providence Residential & Community Care Services Society (PRCC) to transfer the ownership and operations of St. Joseph’s to PRCC – a new entity formed by Providence in 2017 as a strategic priority to enable the renewal and growth of our seniors services and residential care homes. The transition of ownership has been initiated and is targeted for completion on April 1, 2019.

The Views, a non-profit Catholic health care organization like Providence, was previously owned and operated by the Bishop of Victoria.

PRCC’s amalgamation and ownership of The Views will mean its staff will become PRCC employees and Medical Staff will be privileged through PRCC. The process for that transition for staff and medical staff has been initiated and is targeted for completion by April 1, 2019.

“This is an exciting time in our organization,” says Deborah Mitchell, Vice President, Seniors Care, Organizational Strategy and Partnerships. “The Ministry of Health has identified seniors care as one of its key strategic priorities and challenged BC health authorities and organizations to meet the challenge creatively and effectively. We are recognized as leaders of compassionate, resident-centred care for seniors in BC.”

For the past three years, Providence has done comprehensive work through the “Residential Care For Me” and “Megamorphosis” initiatives in developing and implementing innovative models of care in partnership with residents and families.

“Establishing PRCC positions us to focus specifically on seniors care and gives us the flexibility to find partners to enable the development of communities of care we envision,” says Mitchell. “That means moving forward with our renewal at the St. Vincent’s Heather site for our planned dementia village and supporting seniors community services and housing solutions.”

“The change in ownership of The Views to PRCC also accelerates and boosts our plans to redevelop The Views into an innovative, seniors-focused community of care,” says Michael Aikins, Administrative Officer, The Views. “With PRCC as owner, we aspire to build a community with various levels of housing and care options that support seniors, and their spouses and partners, to age in place on a single campus – ranging from independent living, long-term care and specialized dementia care and neighbourhoods.”

PRCC has its own Society and Board members, who are steering the continuing planning and engagement work to achieve the key milestones required in the coming year.

“Our founding congregations of sisters always made the elderly and seniors a key focus of the compassionate and socially just care they provided,” says Fiona Dalton, President & CEO, PHC and PRCC. “And throughout our organization’s history, we have responded to new challenges and the ever-changing needs of our communities with boldness and foresight. PRCC is another, forward-looking stage in that development. It puts us on a path of renewal and leadership, strengthening and revitalizing our seniors care Mission.”

For more information regarding PRCC, please contact PHC Communications at communications@providencehealth.bc.ca.

Providence Advances Seniors Care Commitment with Plans for Second Dementia Village - January 2019

Thanks to its recently announced partnership with Island Health and the Ministry of Health, Providence Residential & Community Care (PRCC) Services Society is one step closer to achieving its vision of developing a dementia village in Comox on Vancouver Island.

The proposed Comox dementia village will be separate from, and in addition to, the one announced last February for Heather Street in Vancouver. The Comox dementia village will be constructed at the site of the existing St. Joseph’s Hospital. The 17-acre site that overlooks the ocean is currently home to The Views, a residential care home, and the former St. Joseph’s General acute care hospital that was vacated with the opening of the new North Island Hospital. Official transfer of ownership and operations of the 117-bed care home and four hospice beds to PRCC will take place this spring.

The Dutch model for seniors care – known as the dementia village in De Hogeweyk, Netherlands – will serve as the vision for the dementia village at St. Joseph’s/The Views in Comox as it will for the Heather Street site in Vancouver.

PRCC is a new entity created by Providence Health Care to support and enable their future vision for seniors’ services, including the renewal of their residential care homes.

“Providence Residential and Community Care is grateful to Island Health and the Ministry of Health for giving us additional beds at St. Joseph’s Hospital, allowing us capacity to create a dementia village. With this expansion to Vancouver Island, PRCC has taken the next step to fulfilling its mandate to become a leader in seniors care, which other health care organizations and jurisdictions may eventually emulate,” said Jo-Ann Tait, Providence corporate director, seniors care and palliative services.

The Comox dementia village will provide care and treatment for people with dementia through a variety of means. Upholding the spirit of compassion of the founding Catholic Sisters, Providence looks after some of Vancouver’s most vulnerable populations in its residential care homes, and PRCC will ensure it continues to do so at its envisioned dementia villages.

PRCC aspires to build a community in Comox with various levels of housing and care options that support seniors, and their spouses and partners, to age in place on a single campus – ranging from independent living, long-term care and specialized dementia care and neighbourhoods.

The Comox dementia village will feature many aspects of the Dutch model such as smaller households for residents who share a common bond with each other. The entire perimeter is expected to be secured using creative structure and technology so that residents can easily venture outside as much as they like.

PRCC’s goal is to create vibrancy and an authentic sense of community with amenities that are actual destinations and points of interest for people and their families to enjoy, including a grocery store, pub, and music room.

Research has shown that person-centred dementia care not only optimizes quality of life for people with dementia, it can actually foster positive outcomes for people afflicted by a disease normally steeped in fear and confusion.

The Comox dementia village is only one component of an entire master site plan with specifics to be determined going forward. PRCC will identify those needs through engagement, consultation, and working closely with stakeholders, partners and the community.  

In addition to the dementia village, there are opportunities to build and provide numerous other services and programs on the campus to meet local, community and regional needs. These services may include more housing solutions, respite care, bathing and meal programs, primary care services, youth services, and Indigenous health services.

Comox has a critical need for seniors’ services now which is expected to increase over the next two decades. Alzheimer’s and dementia patients present the most urgent housing and care needs. In 15 years, the number of Canadians living with dementia is expected to nearly double, making the development of dementia villages like the ones planned for St. Joseph’s in Comox and Heather Street in Vancouver more important than ever.

Established in 2017, PRCC has its own society and board members who are steering the continuing planning and engagement work to achieve key milestones required in the coming year.

The Views at St. Joseph’s is a Catholic health care organization previously owned and operated by the Bishop of Victoria. PRCC’s ownership of The Views will mean its staff will become PRCC employees and medical staff will be privileged through PRCC as of April 1, 2019.

To view the Ministry of Health announcement, go to: https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2019HLTH0009-000040.

PRCC Officially Established – June 2017

Providence Health Care’s (PHC) visionary plan to become provincial leaders and innovators in seniors care surpassed a major milestone, with the PHC Society and Board formally approving the establishment of the Providence Residential and Community Care (PRCC) Services Society – a new and separate society to be comprised of PHC’s residential homes and elder care services.

The decision, made at the June 14th PHC Annual General Meeting, came after a 10-month-long due-diligence process to determine whether a new society can effectively operate, thrive and achieve our exciting seniors care vision through redevelopment and renewal of our care homes.

PRCC has its own Society and Board members, who steer the continuing planning and engagement work to achieve PRCC’s goals.

Those goals include amalgamating into PRCC other seniors and residential care partners and homes, including The Views at St. Joseph’s and Providence Health Care’s seniors/elder care homes and services.

These homes and elder care services and staff will be transferred to PRCC in the future, after more engagement and comprehensive transition planning is done with staff, unions, residents, families and health partners.

The Ministry of Health has identified seniors care as one of its key strategic priorities and challenged BC health authorities and organizations to meet the challenge creatively and effectively.

Over the past year and a half, Providence’s elder care program and residential redevelopment planning team have made great strides in developing exciting, innovative and resident- and family-centered solutions for such future seniors’ communities of care.

Many staff, residents and families have contributed their ideas toward the planning and great momentum has been built toward developing “Dementia Villages” and communities of care for seniors.

Providence’s founding congregations of sisters always made the elderly and seniors a key focus of the compassionate and socially just care they provided. And throughout the organization’s history, Providence has responded to new challenges and the ever-changing needs of our communities with boldness and foresight.

When formed in 2000, Providence Health Care was the latest iteration of that courage, bringing together separate Catholic Missions into our current Society.

PRCC is another, forward-looking stage in that development.

It puts PRCC on a path of renewal and leadership, strengthening and revitalizing its seniors care Mission.

It Takes a Village to Help People Live Well with Dementia

A Dutch model for seniors care – known as the dementia village in De Hogeweyk, Netherlands – will serve as the vision for a major redevelopment in Vancouver to be led by Providence Residential and Community Care (PRCC).

The De Hogeweyk dementia village fosters free movement of people with dementia within a homey setting, and involvement of them in everyday activities within the household or the wider, secure neighbourhood. The former St. Vincent’s Hospital at Heather Street and West 33rd Avenue in Vancouver is the proposed site for the redevelopment.

Currently, Providence Health Care (PHC) is working on this new social model of resident-directed care for people with dementia. PHC is expected to transfer the planning and redevelopment to PRCC in the future, as the new Society becomes fully functional and operational. A clinical services plan for the Heather Street dementia village has been completed, along with a functional plan with drawings, in consultation with an architect.

The land designated for site development is being provided through the generosity of the Archdiocese of Vancouver. 

The De Hogeweyk dementia village is viewed internationally as a hallmark of innovation in residential care of people living with dementia and has received media attention as a result. It is one of 16 elder care sites visited by planning staff during a five-country, information-gathering tour in Europe.

Jo-Ann Tait, the Providence’s corporate director of seniors care and palliative services who participated in the tour, says the Heather Street dementia village will emulate many aspects of the Dutch model. For example, it will focus on the establishment of smaller households for residents who share a common bond with each other, such as cultural or friendship-based.

The Heather Street dementia village will also see the return of regular, daily life for residents. Usually, when people with dementia enter residential care, they are relieved of the kinds of regular household routines and puttering about – from cooking to cleaning to sweeping the floor or making their beds – which are so often the cornerstone of home life and define one’s sense of belonging to it.

“We wonder why seniors sit in their chairs asleep and become disengaged with the world around them. Without normal life experiences, isolation and loneliness begin to creep in. And we know life experience is not about keeping residents busy to pass the time. It’s more than bingo and bowling,” said Tait.

As a result, residents will have access to kitchens where they can prepare food with and under the supervision of staff, as well as washers and dryers, possibly even clotheslines or drying racks.

The entire perimeter will be enclosed and secured using creative structure and layout as well as technology so that residents can easily venture outdoors. They will be encouraged to get outside as much and as often as possible, free of the traditional restraints, constraints and wander guards that have kept them confined to their chairs and indoors for most of their residential life.

PHC’s goal is to create vibrancy and an authentic sense of community with amenities that are actual destinations and points of interest for people and their families to enjoy, including a grocery store, pub, and child daycare.

In alignment with that goal is the intention to have the Heather Street dementia village also welcome the outside community into residential care. For too long, residential care homes have been areas where the community or visitors come by invitation only, if at all. In the dementia village, visitors will be able to drop by and become part of the community whether that means stopping in for a meal or renting spaces for music instruction or allowing kids to practice their instruments after school while nearby residents watch and listen.